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Home Archive for category "Leverage Ratios" (Page 4)
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Basel Committee Proposes Non-Internal Model Method for Capitalizing Counterparty Credit Risk Exposures

Today, the Basel Committee proposed a non-internal model method (NIMM) for assessing the counterparty credit risk associated with derivative transactions. The proposal would, when finalized, replace the Basel capital framework’s existing methods for determining the credit exposure amount for derivatives, i.e., the Current Exposure Method (CEM) and the Standardized Approach.

According to the Basel Committee, NIMM improves the risk sensitivity of the CEM by differentiating between margined and unmargined trades.  NIMM also revises certain supervisory factors to reflect the level of volatilities observed over the recent stress period and provides a more meaningful recognition of the benefits of legally enforceable netting agreements.…  Read More

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Federal Reserve Governor Tarullo Delivers Speech Setting Forth Roadmap for U.S. Prudential Regulatory Reforms

Today, Federal Reserve Governor Daniel K. Tarullo delivered a speech setting forth a roadmap for prudential regulatory reforms in the United States.  Among other things, Governor Tarullo:

  • U.S. Basel III:  Appealed to other U.S. bank regulators to approve the U.S. Basel III final rules to avoid further implementation delays, noting that they can always seek further changes down the road.
  • Leverage Ratio:  Suggested that the Federal Reserve may require the largest U.S. firms to maintain a Basel III leverage ratio greater than the 3% agreed upon by the Basel Committee.
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Brown-Vitter Bill: Commentary and Analysis

The bill announced by Senators Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and David Vitter (R-La.) is the latest volley in the ongoing debate about whether financial reform has gone far enough in ending the risk that some banks are too big to fail. Although it is highly unlikely that the Brown-Vitter bill, in its current form, will become law, its erroneous assumptions and assertions, as well as the policy measures proposed by the bill, could resurface, either in other bills or as pressure on regulators to transform the financial regulatory landscape.…  Read More

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